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Project funding available from WWF. Applications close 26 October.

WWF is looking for hands-on community conservation groups that WWF-New Zealand and The Tindall Foundation can help fund.
Groups can focus on anything from habitat restoration and wildlife protection, to teaching skills that empower communities to care for their local environment.

Community groups can apply for up to $15,000 to amplify their amazing work and help our country’s precious nature thrive.

If you’re taking part in a conservation project, then we’d love for you to apply here.

Together, we can make a lasting impact for Aotearoa - and our planet.

Petition to desex and register cats. (closes 31 October)

Erica Rowlands has started a petition: That the House of Representatives pass legislation requiring all domestic cats to be registered via microchip to their legal owners, and to be desexed unless kept contained by registered cat breeders.

It is widely known that cats cause problems for native species, and that rescue groups face relentless battle against the effects of irresponsible owners. We have committed as a nation to invest in the goal of being predator free by 2050, but with no improvement in sight for the management of pet cats, or the elimination of feral populations. Requiring cats to be registered and desexed will reduce their populations, enforce responsible cat ownership, and protect our wildlife.

Cats eat shore birds and lizards. Your signature counts.

https://www.parliament.nz/…/petition-of-erica-rowlands…

Coastal Restoration Coordinator wanted for Coromandel. Applications close Sunday.

Thames Coromandel District Council is looking for a Coastal Restoration Coordinator. Here a little bit of information:

About the role

The coordinator promotes the coastal restoration programme and works with a broad range of stakeholders, including Waikato Regional Council, Department of Conservation, Coastcare coordinators, local iwi, rural and suburban communities

Key responsibilities include:

  • Coastal restoration and promotional activities
  • Community, key stakeholder planting days and working bees
  • Monitoring dune restoration activities

For more information and to apply please go to this page.

Summer intern vacancies in Northland. APPLY BY FRIDAY

A number of internships are available over summer with Northland Regional Council.

Opportunities are available in the following areas:

  • Freshwater Ecology (2 positions) - assist in ecological monitoring of rivers and streams, freshwater fish monitoring, macroinvertebrate sampling and more.
  • Coastal Monitoring - assist in plan and conduct assessments of dune health, monitoring of marine plastic and litter, intertidal shellfish survey and ecological assessments of Northland’s estuaries.
  • Compliance Monitoring - varied role predominantly monitoring water bores and assisting with water sampling and collecting data.
  • Investment Property -learning about large scale commercial property management and Health and Safety requirements for contractor management.
  • Marine Biosecurity - assisting with the annual hull surveillance programme, lab work, in-water survey, community engagement events.

For more information and to apply, please go the the NRC website.

Update from our newest scholarship recipient Cassandra Newman

Figure 1: Curio Bay shorelines derived from historic satellite imageryFigure 1: Curio Bay shorelines derived from historic satellite imageryMy starting title for my thesis is: Utilising 3D drone imagery for coastal erosion analysis at historic landfill sites on sand dunes in Southland New Zealand.

Figure 2: Estimate of 2050 and 2100 shoreline with linear net erosion / accretion. Errors using a linear model to predict a dynamic coastFigure 2: Estimate of 2050 and 2100 shoreline with linear net erosion / accretion. Errors using a linear model to predict a dynamic coastI have changed the scope of my study based on the sites I have chosen. Instead of landfill sites being investigated, I am just changing the term to anthropogenic debris. I took the main landfill site off my survey list due to it being a bird nesting site most of the year which became an issue with flying a drone around (birds tend to investigate by swarming). I have four sites which are Monkey Island, Colac Bay, Fortrose, and Curio Bay. The anthropogenic structures at these sites include concrete and structural rubbish throughout the dunes, an abandoned coastal road and housing development on the beachfront. Management and monitoring of these sites is important to prevent environmental degradation that this debris may cause as the coast changes around it.

Figure 3: Distance of historic shorelines from the 2020 shoreline measured in metres. ‘0’ is the 2020 shoreline on the y axis, to the left of that are the years where erosion occurred and to the right is where accretion occurred. Each transect number was analysed (124 in total for Curio Bay) and the patterns were catergorised into four groups.Figure 3: Distance of historic shorelines from the 2020 shoreline measured in metres. ‘0’ is the 2020 shoreline on the y axis, to the left of that are the years where erosion occurred and to the right is where accretion occurred. Each transect number was analysed (124 in total for Curio Bay) and the patterns were catergorised into four groups.I have been knuckling down on my research over the past couple months and have found some really interesting results! Over the past few weeks my focus has been on using historic satellite imagery to see if I can find patterns that occur on our coastlines that lead to erosion or accretion. This involved a lot of problem solving with my workflow and the outputs that would be optimal for my research. I have four sites but have been focusing my problem solving on Curio Bay (figure 1) to get a methodology sorted that can be easily replicated for my other sites (maybe future sites as well). I had created estimates of the shoreline in 2050 and 2100 but realised I need to go through and take out all the outliers (figure 2). The results were also linear which is not how the dynamics of the coast worked. I needed to work out how the dynamics worked to predict future shorelines more accurately. The distance of historic shorelines from the 2020 shoreline were recorded. Each transect computed on ArcGIS is 20 m apart and were individually analysed (124 in total for Curio Bay) and the patterns (figure 3) were catergorised into four groups. These four groups are eroding, accreting, stable and unstable (figure 4). This was then inputed back into the map to show where these four patterns were occuring. Time to dive into the ‘why’ these patterns are occuring where they are.

Figure 4: Transects of the shoreline at Curio Bay (length of transects differ for each year, this is then merged together). The transects were put into 4 groupsFigure 4: Transects of the shoreline at Curio Bay (length of transects differ for each year, this is then merged together). The transects were put into 4 groupsDrone work:

Figure 5: Cloud compare software comparing the May survey of the Monkey Island shoreline against the February survey. C2C absolute distances measured in metresFigure 5: Cloud compare software comparing the May survey of the Monkey Island shoreline against the February survey. C2C absolute distances measured in metresI have two surveys completed for my drone work but unfortunately when I processed the images from the May survey, the model was skewed in a dome shape so any analysis I do between my surveys will not result in highly accurate outputs (figure 5). This was due to the nature of my survey area being long and thin and the drone not being calibrated properly beforehand. To counter this anomaly for my next survey I have made my survey area more of a square shape. I will do a second flight of each area from 100 m AGL (above ground level) to provide more information of the site for the processing software. My surveys are around 50 m AGL to get accurate fast imagery. Figure 5 shows the May survey of the Monkey Island shoreline against the February survey. The software used for processing was Agisoft Metashape Professional (Agisoft Metashape Version 1.7.2) and Cloud Compare (Cloud Compare software Version 2.11.2) was used to lay the different surveys on top of each other to capture the volumetric differences in the dune over the three months. C2C absolute distances is measured in metres (figure 5). The red in blotches in the images are cars that were present with one survey but not the other. The main information from this figure is the green horizonal dune line throughout the middle of the image, showing the dune changed around 30 cm from one survey against the other. The green on the sides of the image is caused by the May survey site imagery curling upwards due to wrong calibrations of the drone and as a side effect of having a small site. This imagery can be hard to interpret so I will investigate doing this analysis with software that is more widely used such as ArcGIS (ArcGIS System Software version 10.8.1).

A lot of the work I have done has been in understanding the coastlines and how to analyse patterns that may occur. I am hopeful this will be very beneficial in monitoring, management, and restoration of these coasts which I will investigate for the next part of my thesis!